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pobalin sporočil: 12.226
[#2771867] 25.04.19 12:08
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Zadnja sprememba: pobalin 25.04.2019 12:20
A milijardo jenov prve varščine oziroma so mu že vrnili? Zakaj je zdaj varščina pol manjša, če število obtožb narašča? A to zanima samo mene?

Itak je pa za poslovni folk, ki menda bere tale medij, bolj relevantno, kaj se dogaja z oslabljenim Nissanom, ki je bil menda lani manj dobičkonosen kot njegov največji delničar.
Nissan Motor Co slashed its full-year profit forecast to its lowest in nearly a decade due to weakness in the United States, just as it adjusts to life without Carlos Ghosn and charts its future with alliance partner Renault SA.
The Japanese automaker expects operating profit for the year ended March to drop 45 percent versus a year earlier to 318 billion yen ($2.84 billion), from a previous forecast for 450 billion yen, on expenses related to extending vehicle warranties in the United States, its biggest market.
Nissan also blamed the arrest of former Chairman Ghosn for tarnishing its brand and contributing to the decline in profit to the lowest since the year ended March 2010.
www.reuters.com/arti...SKCN1RZ2MA
P.S.: aja, saj CNN piše, da še ni "pravnomočno", tožilci so se pritožili.
A Tokyo district court announced that Ghosn was granted bail on Thursday at 500 million yen ($4.5 million).
Prosecutors appealed the decision, noting the court acknowledged that Ghosn was planning to contact people related to the case and could destroy evidence.
Bail proceedings have been halted while the court reviews the appeal.
pobalin sporočil: 12.226
[#2771873] 25.04.19 12:29 · odgovor na: pobalin (#2771867)
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Reuters je v zvezi z afero Ghosn objavil zanimivo zgodbo o slasteh "pocestnega" žurnalizma, te neslavne, proletarske plati novinarskega posla.
That often means waiting for hours on suburban streets or outside offices to accost corporate bosses and politicians for what are called “burasagari,” or stakeout briefings. Such vigils were an important part of Reuters coverage in the days following the arrest in November of Ghosn, the former head of Nissan Motor Co.
One particular kind of ambush journalism practiced in Japan is “yomawari,” or night raids, when reporters stake out the residence of an executive or politician, hoping to catch them on their way home.
Night raids over the Ghosn story became so frequent and heavily attended that Nissan sent registered letters in December to news organizations asking them to stop visiting the homes of their executives. The company said neighbors had complained and that the “intrusive reporting” had led to one passerby getting injured, without elaborating.
www.reuters.com/arti...SKCN1S10A0

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